Sunday, May 23, 2010

The Mighty Maruo Returns

Fans of Suehiro Maruo and Edogawa Ranpo have reason to rejoice this quarter with the publication of Ranpo Panorama.

This is a stunning, glossy Japanese gift in which Suehiro interprets the works of Japanese literary giant Edogawa Ranpo.

Variations on twenty-six English characters can not adequately describe the magic, wonder, and romantic sensuality to be found within these pages.

The artist has excelled himself in this work, and it is easily his best since the publication of his groundbreaking 'Maruograph' volumes.

The book is available through US stores such as Kinokuniya for the paltry price of US$33, or through Amazon.co.jp

Like artists such as Toshio Saeki and Hideshi Hino, Maruo finds fresh flesh beneath the fascia that somehow holds us together. His art is a lifelong poem to passionate invention unhindered by fear and social pressure.

A massive bonus in this volume is the inclusion, care of Beam Comics, of Suehiro Maruo's unofficial sequel to Mr. Arshi's Amazing Freak Show.

Also based on a Ranpo story, "The Midget is Dancing" is a delightfully grotesque, beautiful, and subversive tale in which a midget finds true love after an act of dismemberment.

Do not hesitate to add this titanic volume to your literary ossuary of perversion.

From Enterbrain and Beam Comics (c) 2010

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Scans above are not accurate representations of the actual art appearing in this book. Due to the difficulty of scanning bound pages, the scans are compromises intended to give you a taste only of the beauty to be found within Ranpo Panorama.

4 comments:

  1. Cool, thanks for the heads up. Rampo + Maruo = ultimate ero-guro!

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  2. One of my favorite artists of all time!

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  3. Amazing!

    In some way reminds me of the artwork of Aubrey Beardsley, maybe because of the English was inspired by XIXth century japanese pictures

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  4. Patrick -- a winning formula!

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    D8X8 -- mine, too, along with Saeki and Hino.

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    Revista -- The Beardsley comparison is a good one.

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