Saturday, September 12, 2009

Humping Trash

Trash Humpers, the new film from Harmony Korine, the director of Gummo, Julien Donkey Boy, and Mr. Lonely, looks like a must-see proposition (to me, at least).

It just played the Toronto International Film Festival and received some positive reviews; of course, reviews of such a film are all relative to one's individual tastes.

The film piqued my curiosity because of the slightly deformed, "challenged" characters.

The top still looks like an echo of John Waters' Desperate Living with a new Jean Hill (the black fatty) for the 21st century.

The old blokes look like brothers of the old bloke parodies from Jackass (Johnny Knoxville got it very right when he played one of these to perfection).

I can't say I love Korine's films, but I do love his passion for the bizarre and marginalized. I just get bored with his work at times.

Without a doubt, I will be fixating on this film for a while.

And while I (and possibly you) am doing that, let's spare a thought for one of the first and best on-screen freaks, the great Johnny Eck (from Todd's Browning's film of the same name).

This photograph of Johnny, who went into seclusion after his home was burglarized and he was beaten in '88, was collected by Mark Feldman and published in Jack Stevenson's Pandemonium magazine (Issue 3).

By all accounts, Johnny was a golden human being.

3 comments:

  1. I have tickets to see this. Hopefully it'll be good.

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  2. Trash Humpers, hmm? Sounds like something worthy of my precious time... Thank you for bringing it to my attention. ^^

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  3. I saw it recently. WAAAY up your alley I think.

    Picture ERASERHEAD via BLAIR WITCH in the trashy deep South, the film is designed to look like a blank VHS tape you'd find in a garbage dump and pop in your player out of sheer curosity, it's the denegerate home movies of a bunch of complete social exiles who just follow their every perverse instinct. It is sort of an unintentional (Korine seems to dislike metaphor and intellectualizing and approach filmmaking from an entirely intuitive level) funhouse mirror mockery of the twilight of WALMART consumer society and where it's taken us.

    I enjoyed it, it's something different and goddamn, it gave me an experience I'll never forget. You almost feel a sort of nostalgia or envy for the place of pure, unadultered freedom outside of society's monotonous confines that these TRASH HUMPERS exist at.

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