Tuesday, February 3, 2009

What Are YOU Doing After The Orgy?

If the title question was being directed at the beautiful Christine Lindberg, it's a fair one, and the answer would have been: "Plenty."

This, Lindberg's first film, was followed by close to 22 others including Thriller - A Cruel Picture ('74) and Norifumi Suzuki's amazing Sex and Fury ('73).

Known as Rotmanad ('70) in Sweden, What Are You Doing After The Orgy? is not a film I have a clear memory of.

It is a title I have never forgotten.

Mary Millington was publisher David Sullivan's pornographic "It" girl. Millington was immensely popular in British flesh mags, so her transition to film seemed natural. Unfortunately, her movies, though successful, were busts, and she faded quickly.

Due to the harshness of British censorship at the time, the only pornographic thing about Come Play With Me were the centerfolds Mary did to promote the flick.

From the director of Scarface, Carlito's Way, and Dressed To Kill.

Yes, Brian De Palma made this in '72 after Hi, Mom.

Although it played at Melbourne's premier porn palace, it is not, in fact, a sex movie at all, even though it is very sexy.

Orson Welles appears as a tap dancer (!)


Light-hearted, mildly erotic sex comedy that played in one Melbourne venue, the Roma, for an extraordinary two years.

Again, a fair question, and I don't have any answers.

From the director of The Vampire Happening.

I can't argue with the claim that Janine Reynaud (pictured) was a "luscious beauty".

I love this -- "A macabre tryst with death and hell's bloody speedway".

After the success of Bedroom Mazurka, the Swedish softcore pipe opened up.

Danish director John Hilbard died in 2001; he left a string of good-spirited sex flicks.

If anybody can help me identify this film, I'd appreciate it.

It could be a retitling of The Bizarre Life of Dominas ('69) or Henri Pachard's The Bizarre Ones ('68) or neither. Pachard's film is a fairly brutal roughie, so I'm unconvinced that this is that film -- especially since it is aimed at those who enjoyed Case of the Smiling Stiffs, a retitled, early Sean Cunningham sex comedy.


'65 thriller with a little tension.

"Bed her late than never!" Love it.

Euro title is Le Voyageur.

The star, Marie-France Broquet, was a stunningly beautiful woman who had a short career in "Continental Films".

Agnar Mykle, a Norwegian, had a fascinating life, as did this novel.

In '58, Mykle and his publisher were charged with publishing obscene and immoral material after 'Song of the Red Ruby', a semi-autobiographical -- and beautiful -- novel, was published.

Mykle's career was ruined by the controversy that surrounded this case. He became a recluse and co-wrote a book about puppet theater, Dukketeater. It is revered in in its native country.

Now, his books are considered classics of Norwegian literature, and he is credited with being a major influence on the liberalization of sexuality and censorship in Scandinavia in the late 50's and into the 60's.

The film borrows elements of the novel, but it errs on the side of mild farce (with sex).

Mykle's book celebrates sexuality and nature; the film does possess a gentleness and honesty about its subject that Mykle might have appreciated.

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